Fashion & textiles

Circular Economy Podcast Episode 44 Tamsin Chislett - Onloan

Episode 44 Tamsin Chislett of Onloan

Catherine Weetman talks to Tamsin Chislett, cofounder of fashion subscription startup Onloan, which has grown strongly this year despite lockdown.
Onloan is a bit different to other UK fashion rental options because it partners directly with top contemporary fashion brands, and it focuses on ‘elevated daywear’ rather than occasion wear. Onloan is also different because it does all its garment care and logistics in-house. Onloan offers its customers a way to enjoy all the newness and variety of fast fashion, but without the waste, and with much better clothes.
We find out why fashion subscription works so well for the customer and the brands, why Onloan’s customer base doesn’t fit typical demographics, and how Tamsin convinced those first few brands to come on board.

Circular Economy Podcast Episode 38 - Zaqiya Cajee of SwopItup

Episode 38 – Zaqiya Cajee of SwopItup

Zaqiya Cajee is a young entrepreneur in the UK who has set up a not-for-profit scheme. SwopItUp helps young people to swap their fashionable clothes, so they can experiment with different trends, colours, shapes and so on, without being part of the throwaway culture – and save money!
We’ll hear how SwopItUp is developing technology to engage users and to help overcome the challenges of distancing during lockdow, to reduce the risk of the virus spreading via the clothes, and to track and analyse swapping trends.

Circular Economy Insights #23

Circular Insights #23

A purpose beyond profit

Dignified Wear in Ghana | The Thingery| ikigai for business purpose | Terracycle: doing the right thing for people and planet | Digital platforms for fashion supply chains | Fashion’s reset?|HP and Circular Computing |

Circular insights #21

Podcast: The Textile Review | Blog: Textile Reuse | Redefining Purpose | Build Back Better | Power and Responsibility | National Geographic | Sustainable Smartphones? |

Your trash is someone else’s treasure: matchmaking for end-of-use textiles

The Textile Review, founded by Katie Briggs, is making fabric use more circular and sustainable, with services to repurpose and reuse textiles. It connects businesses, designers and students, matching ‘I have’ with ‘I need’ and creating value for both providers and users. The Textile Review aims to ‘help end the issue of single use textiles across event and design industries’, by slowing the flow of resources. We examine the different ways it creates value for both providers and users.

Circular insights #20

Podcast: Baukjen sustainable fashion | Blog: Fashion: from fast and forgettable to slow and sustainable – why purpose-driven brands are choosing circular strategies | Recommerce not recycling | Thriving post-pandemic |

Fashion: from fast and forgettable to slow and sustainable – why purpose-driven brands like Baukjen and Isabella Oliver are choosing circular strategies

Will fast fashion survive the coronavirus lockdown? Big brands are cancelling orders and treating their suppliers as disposable. The time is right for slow, sustainable and circular fashion. We go behind the scenes to look at how the Baukjen and Isabella Oliver brands take a different approach, with beautiful, timeless designs and ethical, more sustainable production. We examine the brands’ circular and partnership approaches through the lens of Permaculture.

Circular Economy Podcast Episode 25 Geoff van Sonsbeeck - Baukjen

Episode 25 Geoff van Sonsbeeck – Baukjen

Geoff van Sonsbeeck is the Co-Founder and CEO behind the direct to consumer womenswear brands BAUKJEN and ISABELLA OLIVER, and has been at the forefront of the slow, sustainable fashion movement for over 15 years.
We talk about how the two brands are building on their durable and timeless design ethos and evolving a range of circular practices. These include takeback schemes, resale, and rental. Baukjen is also switching to more sustainable fabrics – even moving away from organic cotton.
We also discuss how consumer attitudes are changing, including the growing interest in fashion rental.

Transforming plastic waste into social value

Across Africa, and much of the world, end-of-use plastic is not collected for proper recycling. Instead, it is burnt; ends up in drains, sewers, fields and rivers; or in unprotected landfill, allowing toxins and microplastics to leak out. This is one of the hidden costs of our modern ‘linear’ economy – take, make and waste. Four entrepreneurs are turning that plastic waste into value – creating jobs for both disadvantaged and skilled people, improving local environments, and helping people find a purpose. We dig into their business models and hear their top tips for circular startups